Cause Effect Conjunction


there are some conjunctions which have same meaning with because such as since, as, for, now that, inasmuch as, and as long as. Well, to make it short, let’s start with the first explanation one: Because.

BECAUSE

Because is a conjunction which shows cause and effect relationship. Because introduces an adverb clause. It is followed by a subject and a verb. It is usually used when the reason is the most important part of the sentence. Look at the pattern below:

Clause 1 (as a cause): My tyre (tire) was flat.
Clause 2 (as a effect): I came late.

Then, we combine the two clauses above with conjunction because.

Combination 1: I came late because my tyre was flat. Or
Combination 2: Because My tyre was flat, I came late.

When Because is combined with Clause 1 (as a cause), The clause then called Because-Clause. Therefore, we can determine the patterns based on the example.

Pattern of Combination 1:
Clause 2 + Because + Clause 1 or
Effect-Clause + Because Clause

Pattern of Combination 2:
Because + Clause 1 + , (comma) + Clause 2 or
Because-Clause + , (comma) + Effect-Clause

(Note that Because-Clause usually came at the end of a sentence as in Combination 1. However, if the Because-Clause comes at the beginning, put a comma after the clause as in Combination2)

Look at the other examples below:

a. C1. Jufry passed the final examination because He studied hard.
C2. Because Jufry studied hard, he passed the final examination.

b. C1. My son went to bed because he was sleepy.
C2. Because My son was sleepy, he went to bed.

c. C1. The rice crop failed because the drought was long.
C2. Because the drought was long, the rice crop failed.

Source: English for the World

AS and SINCE

As and Since are conjunctions. Yet on the certain situation, they have same meaning with because to show cause and effect. As and Since are used when the reason is already understood or is less important than the rest of the sentence. Yet Since is a little more formal than as. Look at the pattern below:

Clause 1 (as a cause): The king had been assassinated.
Clause 2 (as a effect): The prince was crowned.

Then, we combine the two clauses above with conjunction as and since

Combination 1: The prince was crowned as/since the king had been assassinated. Or

Combination 2: Since/as the king had been assassinated, The prince was crowned.

From the examples above, we then determine the patterns.

Pattern of Combination 1:
Clause 2 + as/since + Clause 1

Pattern of Combination 2:
as/since Clause 1 + , (comma) + Clause 2

Look at the other examples below:

a. C1. I decided to book into a hotel as/since as it was getting late,
C2. As/since it was getting late, I decided to book into a hotel.

b. C1. You can go first as/since you’re the oldest.
C2. As/since you’re the oldest, you can go first.

c. C1. Let’s have a cup of coffee since/as we’ve got a few minutes to wait for the train.
C2. Since/as we’ve got a few minutes to wait for the train, let’s have a cup of coffee.

Source: English for the World

FOR

For that we will discuss here means Because. For suggests that the reason is given as an afterthought. And we have to note first that For-Clause never comes at the beginning of the sentence. Now, look at the pattern below (by using the first sentence above):

Clause 1 (as a cause): I really need it to do my assignments from my college.
Clause 2 (as a effect): I decided to buy this notebook.

Then, we combine the two clauses above with conjunction FOR
I decided to buy this notebook for I really need it to do my assignments from my college.

From the examples above, we then determine the patterns.

Pattern of Combination 1 (only one):
Clause 2 + for + Clause 1 or
Effect-clause + for-clause

Look at the other examples below:

a. She remained silent for her heart was heavy and her spirits low.
b. Kinta told the truth for he knew it was the best thing to do.
c. He came to my house for he wanted to pick his uncle.

Source: English for the World

Now That

Now that means because now. It is used for present and future situations. Now that-clause never come after sentence, it mostly comes at the beginning. Now, look at the pattern below:

Clause 1 (as a cause): The semester is finished.
Clause 2 (as a effect): I’m going to take a rest.

Then, we combine the two clauses above with conjunction Now that

Now That the semester is finished, I’m going to take a rest..

From the examples above, we then determine the patterns.

Pattern of Combination 1 (only one):

Clause 2 + Now That + Clause 1 or

Effect-clause + Now That-clause

Look at the other examples below:

a. Now that it is holyday, I want to bring my family on vocation.
b. Now that it is raining, you have to wear this raincoat.
c. Now that the day is sunny, It will be better to bring this umbrella.

Source: English for the World

INASMUCH AS

Here, we will discuss about conjunction inasmuch as which means because showing cause and effect. It is usually found only in formal writing and speech, rarely found in informal ones. Inasmuch as used to introduce a phrase which explains why or how much something described in another part of the sentence is true. Look at the pattern below:

Clause 1 (as a cause): You are their commanding officer.
Clause 2 (as a effect): You are responsible for the behaviour of these men.

Then, we combine the two clauses above with conjunction Inasmuch as

· Inasmuch as you are their commanding officer, you are responsible for the behaviour of these men.

From the examples above, we then determine the patterns.

Pattern:
Inasmuch as+ Clause 1 + , (comma) + Clause 2 or
Inasmuch as-Clause + , (comma) + Effect-Clause

Look at the other examples below:

a. Inasmuch as the two governments could not reach an agreement, the possibilities for peace are still remote.
b. Inasmuch as I am your lecturer now, you have to respect me when I am on duty.

Source: English for the World

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